Book Cover
Title Zeus: King of the Gods
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2010
First Printing First Second - 2010
Book Cover
Title Athena: Grey-eyed Goddess
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2010
First Printing First Second - 2010
Book Cover
Title Hera: The Goddess and Her Glory
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2011
First Printing First Second - 2011
Book Cover
Title Hades: Lord of the Dead
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2012
First Printing First Second - 2012
Book Cover
Title Poseidon: Earth Shaker
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2013
First Printing First Second - 2013
Book Cover
Title Aphrodite: Goddess of Love
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2014
First Printing First Second - 2014
Book Cover
Title Ares: Bringer of War
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2015
First Printing First Second - 2015
Book Cover
Title Apollo: The Brilliant One
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2016
First Printing First Second - 2016
Book Cover
Title Artemis: The Goddess of the Hunt
Author George O'Connor
Illustrated By George O'Connor
Publisher First Second - 2017
First Printing First Second - 2017
Category Graphic Novel
Warnings None
Main Characters Zeus, Athena, Hera, Hades, Poseidon, Aprhodite, Apollo, Hermes, Demeter, Pesephone, Ares, Hephaestos, Artemis, Kronos, Gaea, Hercules...and a whole lot more
Main Elements Gods, monsters, heroes
Website www.olympiansrule.com




This series is about heroes with fantastic powers. Strong, larger-than-life characters who can summon lightning, control the sea, turn invisible, or transform themselves into any animal they choose.

Superheroes? No! Greek gods. Get ready for adventures you've only dreamed of as the Greek gods comes to explosive life in OLYMPIANS. Epic battles, daring quests, and terrible monsters away you...

Click to read the summaryZeus: King of the Gods

Click to read the summaryAthena: Grey-Eyed Goddess

Click to read the summaryHera: The Goddess and her Glory

Click to read the summaryHades: Lord of the Dead

Click to read the summaryPoseidon: Earth Shaker

Click to read the summaryAphrodite: Goddess of Love

Click to read the summaryAres: Bringer of War

Click to read the summaryApollo: The Brilliant One

Click to read the summaryArtemis: Goddess of the Hunt




I'm not a big graphic novel reader, but ever since I started getting interested in manga, it seemed a logical jump, especially if the topic were just right.

I read the first six of these books back-to-back, about one a day, and I can't really say anything bad about them. They stick to the original stories, or at least as original as one can get from something that started as an oral tradition and got modified over hundreds and thousands of retellings. But O'Connor also tosses in his own little touches, which are frankly, hilarious. While I would never suggest laughing in the face of an Olympian, Zeus getting caught by Hera having "a picnic with a cow" just had me cracking up (in Hera's book). The look on Zeus' face when he gets in trouble is just priceless (and frequent). The personalities of the different characters really come through in O'Connor's drawings. You also just have to see Discord at Thethis' wedding, as O'Connor said, it was just too bizarre to leave out.

And don't forget to read the notes at the end, they add to information that is provided in the book itself, and point out things you might otherwise have missed. And they are funny too (...point and laugh...)

While written with a younger audience in mind, the subject matter is taken seriously (funny moments notwithstanding) and can be equally enjoyed by adults. While Riordan's books are fun, he takes great liberties with the original stories, while O'Connor's goal is ultimately to educate the reader.

And I have to give him kudos for managing to draw a Hekatonchiere, a being with 50 heads and 100 hands (and there's three of them to boot)...it's no easy thing to try to wrap your mind around what something like *that* would look like. The art style is intriguing, and while I didn't care for how some of the monsters were portrayed (the Cyclopes were explained but he draws really overweight snakes...), others were awesome (such as the Titans, they really looked great and poweful sitting on their mountain thrones).

O'Connor also tries to dig a little deeper into the motivations of the various gods. While Athena, Hera and Aphrodite offer Paris various prizes for picking them as the most beautiful of the goddesses, it wasn't really about beauty, but power (after all, he picked the gift he wanted most, not the prettiest face). Of the conflict inherent in Artemis, both a taker of life and the protector of it. It is interesting to see how powerful the goddesses were in a society where women had very little power indeed.

The books tie in together, events that are just touched upon in one are explained in more detail in another. And he covers not just the gods themselves, but their origins (the Titans), their influences (the Heroes), and of course their children (monstrous or otherwise). And you have to admit there are some freaky stories, such as Athena being born out of Zeus head. You wonder where the ancient Greeks came up with some of this stuff.

While the Egyptian gods are kind of dark and aloof, and well, not human, the Greek gods are very human (superpowers aside) so they get themselves, and the poor mortals that get in their way, into all kinds of trouble. Vain, arrogant, fun-loving and ultimately flawed, they represent human vices and limitations writ large, and as such make for some interesting tales.

Can't wait to see the rest of series. I read that there might be 11 of them, so I'm looking forward to seeing Ares, Apollo, but especially Hermes who seems to be quite the fun guy in his frequent cameo appearance.




Posted: March 2014

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